On The Surface

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Down by the quayside

where fishermen know to sit

young seal making hay

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n.b. I had heard of this young pup’s arrival a week ago and today I saw it surface a few times. Despite the snow in the wind, a woman had taken her coat off to sit on it on the grass embankment and watch the seal diving. It is remarkable how long these creatures can sustain a dive while fishing. It would then pop up its head and have a look around while recharging its lungs. Goodness knows what it finds underwater here, possibly the hire bikes from the city’s first less than secure public cycle scheme of a few years back.

There have been precious few boats on The Broads for over a year and so the river has become a safe navigation for this seal and who knows how many others. It must have found somewhere to rest up too, seals like lolling around on a beach or mudflat for long periods between diving for fish.

Things will change soon, as holidays within the UK become the thing for a while, so these waters will become quite busy, then where will this seal go? Similarly, I wonder how the otters further upstream, even closer to the city centre, will fare.

January Road Trip (XXII)

Wemyss Bay terminus

For rail, but not yet for us

Rothesay ferry waits

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n.b. Cared for by the Friends of Wemyss Bay Station, (operated by the local private railway company), this architectural delight, in tune with the main concourse at Glasgow Central, was built to funnel train passengers down to the waterside for the ferries to holiday isles in the west of Scotland. Not so popular destinations now, but the railway station is ready and waiting to serve if called on again.

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If you get yourself to Wemyss Bay make sure to leave time to nip into The Station Bar. However, the ferry schedule, or sea conditions may give you no option but to hole up for a wee while in the cosy bar, (or adjoining Station Café, or even the second-hand bookshop – when open).

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CLP 26/01/2020