On Hope x

sand grain off balance

others out of kilter fall

wind and tide smoothed shore

~

CLP 25/07/2021

On Water xvi

that helicopter

on a beeline up the coast

air-sea rescue, obvs

n.b. The elements of water and air combine to tragic effect at weekends when the concoction of homo-sapiens, alcohol and sunshine dull the mind, drown common-sense.

CLP 25/04/2021

On Water vii

East wind pulls and catches

ruffles feathers disrupts flow

sky colours in gaps

~

CLP 16/04/2021

L3 (Day 81.9): River

Caught by March gusts. See in these ripples which way the wind blows; we don’t need a weatherman. All is as it should be.

~

CLP 28/03/2021

On Playing x

Can you still call up that glee

in the pit of your guts

when wind picked up leaves and dust

devils spun the whole playground

into a delirious flock of crows

performing flips and twists

free-falling then swooping

up to hang on the vacuum formed

in the lee of a Scots Pine clump?

.

Arms out, fingers splayed like primaries

we whirled across the tarmac playing

kiss chase, ran ragged from wall to wall

making clattered flat-footed stops

and rushed to touch HOME! bricks

lungs aching from screams and squeals

of delight at being chased and disgust

at being caught and held and bumped

heads as a dry peck on chin, cheeks

or an eyelid or brow (only accidently lips)

except that wild day you let me

and it was so revolting and I ran away

and all the girls and boys joined in

the chase and held me while you kissed me

back and shouted out

with all your gut of glee

to the wind-whipped cheers of all

including the dinner ladies too

I HATE YOU, CHRISTOPHER PERRY!

~

n.b. Picture above shows that hateful Perry boy, now embodied in a larger frame, but with same lockdown (3) hair.

CLP 23/01/2021

On Light

Grey screen of winter sky

Cars studded with twin diamonds

Wind whips up lost leaves

~

CLP 26/12/2020

On Trees

When this wind blows

Things sound different

After the leaves have dropped

To mosaic the floor.

~

This wind bends through the bared boughs

Divides to draughts between the trunks

Blows low notes from the wood

Makes this place an instrument

For mournful tunes

~

When we hear this hollow overture

Howling from beeches and birches

We can be certain winter approaches

~

CLP 27/10/2020

Day 19

After a night lit by the not yet full moon, a day of bright sunlight and a strong wind. This blow is hot and drying. It is relentless, like a wind that drives the locals crazy after weeks of it in Crete, or parts of southern Spain. It is not a wind to sit in. It makes people restless, as they seek respite from its nagging.

The hedge birds are also unsettled by this draining draught. They hurry about their business then retreat to sheltered boughs, or nests.

By late afternoon the temperature of the air has encouraged queen wasps to come out. Unmistakably large, they move slowly about in these unusually dry, warm hours in search of somewhere to establish a nest ready for the season of ripened fruit. They will settle down for the rest of Spring and early Summer before their small offspring start appearing looking for sweet food in the orchards and around picnic blankets.

Down on the shoreline the effect of the constant, strong blow on the sea surface is remarkable. The wind seems to flatten the natural motion of the waves like a huge hand smoothing a bedsheet into place on a mattress. There are suggestions of dips where in a bed the ticking would be buttoned tight to the padding. Here the constant movement of the sea over these hollows, this repeated smoothing of the briny sheet, becomes hypnotic. On reaching the beach the waves do not break; the following wind simply brushes each flattened roll up the shingle, as if it were a giant broom.

Turnstones seem unperturbed by the action of the sea. They sustain the quick rhythm of their pecking and picking at the stones whilst wandering heads down in a generally easterly direction. These birds are brown jacketed piece-workers with no time to socialise as they comb the tide line for tidbits.

The force and direction of the wind adds an exciting aspect to the flight of gulls. None travel upwind over the sea, they come inland and use the shelter of the banked shingle to make progress into the headwind. Yet, over the water the gulls, either singly, or in small flights, use the power of the breeze to good effect. They half-turn to gain height, then swoop to get full speed without having to flap their wings at all. A gull’s movement with the wind is all about small adjustments to the angle and tension in the wings and tail. Seeing birds fly so fast, so acrobatically without effort, is breath-taking.

The moon rises through the thin mist that blurs the horizon. It is a huge pock-marked, silvery plate, but still not full.

It’s been a long day. We’ve been busy for the sake of filling the hours. The Queen of England broadcasts a brief message that gives some perspective to the health crisis facing humanity. Similar messages have been broadcast by presidents and political leaders around the world in recent weeks. It is one worth hearing again; this time will pass.

We speak. We speak not of that future time, but of today’s accomplishments, what we have seen and learned. This is the time we have now.

CLP 05/04/2020

Wind Rushed

Flicker of Sun’s disc

Between tilting racing sails

Running on high sea

.

n.b. The Royal Yachting Association provides detailed explanation of sailing terminology at https://www.rya.org.uk/newsevents/e-newsletters/inbrief/Pages/do-you-know-your-points-of-sail.aspx

CLP 27/02/2020