On the Edge

Out here

The East Anglian landscape is so flat

That the curvature of Earth is apparent

And so here is not so flat at all

A world of its own

Even the sea moves on a different level

From beyond the dykes and shingle banks

Winds from North and East hold sway

Mighty oaks are bent to their will

Brow beaten in perpetual homage to Njord

This vast, sparse expanse

Denuded of shape

A dinner plate piled high

With sky

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n.b. We are not alone; it just feels like that sometimes.

n.n.b. Njord was the Norse god of wind and sea, (and wealth).

Unlucky Escape

I fell deep in this fissure

Eluded the forensic harvesting of the scavenging crows

Grew stunted, bent and twisted

Lashed and bound by the cliff-top blows

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n.b. A light piece sprouting from an engaging three hours at the “Trees; Awes & Inspirations” poetry workshop led by Stephen Boyce – a Portsmouth Book Fest 2020 event.

Stephen’s latest collection, ‘The Blue Tree’ is worth reading. A beautiful collection from an accomplished poet. It is published by Indigo Dreams Publishing.

CLP 25/02/2020

Sky Pink

From along the ridge

I saw through Swell Wood’s winter skeleton

To the sun-bathed Levels

Their rain-full grips and rhynes

Fields; mirrors to the sky

That held the pink tinge

Of chilled noses

Numb fingers

Of frost-smoke breath

Of the cold that will fall

From behind the stars tonight

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n.b. Grip: cut in the Levels to ease water run off. Rhyne: water channel cut along field edges to provide a way to hold drinking water for livestock and to mark boundaries in lieu of hedgerows.

CLP 19/01/2020

Open Plan Living

Homes built to protect

From nature’s extremes hold us

Safe as prisoners

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n.b. Realisation that we are in climate crisis has dawned fastest amongst those who live exposed to nature. Its worst manifestations affect the lives of our poorest and most remote communities first and hardest.

Those of us wealthy enough to close our doors and windows to weather, rich enough to produce artificial climates through air-conditioning systems, privileged enough to fly around the world avoiding rising seas and flooding rivers, are now learning that each step we have taken away from living within the complexity of nature, its inconveniences and discomforts, has led us deeper into a cul-de-sac of technology that reinforces the divide between Earth and humankind.

How can we row back when the tide is against us?

Can we start by stepping out and letting nature embrace us, perhaps? I offer you the following link to a simple haiku that celebrates living in nature…”open to anything” by a writer of rare talent.

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CLP 19/01/2020

Unreel

Moments of time caught

Touch stones, listen to echoes

Hot feet on cool flags

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n.b. There are places and events in life that stay close to the heart, others are left in situ for your unexpected, unplanned reappearance, ready to catch you unawares. How you spontaneously respond will tell you a lot about how the evoked recollection has registered with you.

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This morning I heard a remarkable story of coincidence in respect of a death foretold and its place of happening. A poignant moment for the teller.

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This afternoon I found myself in a village that I never thought I would see again without carefully plotting a return. An invitation to pay a visit to a relative led me into surprise and delight on arrival at the location, only once briefly seen in July 2018, on a hot summer day. The fresh cold streams channeled through stone gutters and the reviving beer flooded back to me. I was awash in nostalgia.

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CLP 17/01/2020